Effectiveness

How well do different food compositions and interventions prevent or treat undernutrition, when implemented "on the ground"?

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Supporting Literature: 
  • World Health Organization. "Technical note: supplementary foods for the management of moderate acute malnutrition in infants and children 6–59 months of age." (2012).
  • Suri, D., et al. (2013). "Protein Quality Workshop: Importance of Protein Quality in Prevention and Treatment of Child Malnutrition." Food & Nutrition Bulletin 34 (2): 223-223.
  • 2013 Maternal and Child Nutrition series - The Lancet
  • Webb, Patrick. "Standards of Evidence for Research on ‘What Works’ in the Management of MAM." (2014).
  • Annan, Reginald A., Patrick Webb, and Rebecca Brown. "Management of Moderate Acute Malnutrition (MAM): Current Knowledge and Practice."(2014).
  • Webb, Patrick, Erin Boyd, Saskia de Pee, Lindsey Lenters, Martin Bloem and Werner Schultink. "Nutrition in Emergencies: Do We Know What Works?" Food Policy 49,  (2014): 33-40.

Exposure to a slightly sweet lipid-based nutrient supplement during early life does not increase the level of sweet taste most preferred among 4- to 6-year-old Ghanaian children: follow-up of a randomized controlled trial.

Amino-acid-enriched cereals ready-to-use therapeutic foods (RUTF) are as effective as milk-based RUTF in recovering essential amino acid during the treatment of severe acute malnutrition in children: An individually randomized control trial in Malawi.

PROCOMIDA, a Food-Assisted Maternal and Child Health and Nutrition Program, Reduces Child Stunting in Guatemala: A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Intervention Trial

Background

Food-assisted maternal and child health and nutrition (FA-MCHN) programs may foster child growth during the first 1000 d (pregnancy and the first 2 y of a child's life), but evidence is scant.