Innovation

What novel food-based products and programming methods effectively prevent and treat undernutrition?

Color: 
#490c66
Supporting Literature: 
  • Webb, Patrick, Beatrice Lorge Rogers, Irwin Rosenberg, Nina Schlossman, Christine Wanke, Jack Bagriansky, Kate Sadler, Quentin Johnson, Jessica Tilahun, Amelia Reese Masterson, Anuradha Narayan. 2011. Improving the Nutritional Quality of U.S. Food Aid: Recommendations for Changes to Products and Programs. Boston, MA: Tufts University.
  • 2013 Maternal and Child Nutrition series - The Lancet
  • Shoham, Jeremy, et al. "Proceedings of the World Health Organization/UNICEF/World Food Programme/United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees Consultation on the management of moderate malnutrition in children under 5 years of age." Food and nutrition bulletin. Vol. 30. No. 3 (Supplement). United Nations University Press, 2009.
  • Stone-Jimenez, Maryanne. "Preventing Moderate Acute Malnutrition (MAM) Through Nutrition-Specific Interventions." (2014).
  • Webb, Patrick. "Standards of Evidence for Research on ‘What Works’ in the Management of MAM." (2014).
Long Description: 

- Are cash transfers better than food aid alone?
- Does including a behavior change communication aspect in food aid programs lead to better outcomes?
- Can locally produced foods reduce undernutrition?

A prebiotic-enhanced lipid-based nutrient supplement (LNSp) increases Bifidobacterium relative abundance and enhances short-chain fatty acid production in simulated colonic microbiota from undernourished infants

Effect of an Alternative RUTF on Intestinal Permeability in Children With Severe Acute Malnutrition

Ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF) is the standard of care for the treatment of SAM. UNICEF requires that there be no oil separation in these products necessitating the use of emulsifiers. The effect of emulsifiers on gut health and integrity in children receiving an exclusive diet of RUTF is unknown. The PIs have recently completed a randomized, triple-blind, controlled, clinical equivalency trial in Sierra Leone comparing the alternative oat RUTF (oat-RUTF) to standard RUTF on recovery rates in children with SAM.

Comparison of Treatment of SAM in Children 6-59 Months With RUTF and RUSF in Umerkot, Sindh, Pakistan

In Pakistan, around 15% of children under five are wasted, which is almost twice that of the global prevalence 7.5%. There is a demand for a reliable and consistent locally available severe acute malnutrition (SAM) treatment option since currently the only option is to use an imported ready-to-use-therapeutic food (RUTF). While imported RUTF is successful for treatment of children with SAM, Pakistan is often faced with supply chain issues and consequentially management of SAM with RUTF is unreliable.