Innovation

What novel food-based products and programming methods effectively prevent and treat undernutrition?

Color: 
#490c66
Supporting Literature: 
  • Webb, Patrick, Beatrice Lorge Rogers, Irwin Rosenberg, Nina Schlossman, Christine Wanke, Jack Bagriansky, Kate Sadler, Quentin Johnson, Jessica Tilahun, Amelia Reese Masterson, Anuradha Narayan. 2011. Improving the Nutritional Quality of U.S. Food Aid: Recommendations for Changes to Products and Programs. Boston, MA: Tufts University.
  • 2013 Maternal and Child Nutrition series - The Lancet
  • Shoham, Jeremy, et al. "Proceedings of the World Health Organization/UNICEF/World Food Programme/United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees Consultation on the management of moderate malnutrition in children under 5 years of age." Food and nutrition bulletin. Vol. 30. No. 3 (Supplement). United Nations University Press, 2009.
  • Stone-Jimenez, Maryanne. "Preventing Moderate Acute Malnutrition (MAM) Through Nutrition-Specific Interventions." (2014).
  • Webb, Patrick. "Standards of Evidence for Research on ‘What Works’ in the Management of MAM." (2014).
Long Description: 

- Are cash transfers better than food aid alone?
- Does including a behavior change communication aspect in food aid programs lead to better outcomes?
- Can locally produced foods reduce undernutrition?

Research protocol local ingredients-based supplementary food as an alternative to corn-soya blends plus for treating moderate acute malnutrition among children aged 6 to 59 months: a randomized controlled non-inferiority trial in Wolaita.

Impact on child acute malnutrition of integrating a preventive nutrition package into facility-based screening for acute malnutrition during well-baby consultation: A cluster-randomized controlled trial in Burkina Faso

Community-based Clinical Trial With Microbiota-directed Complementary Foods (MDCFs) Made of Locally Available Food Ingredients for the Management of Children With Primary Moderate Acute Malnutrition

Burden: A total of 52 million children under 5 are suffering from acute malnutrition globally, of whom 33 million have moderate acute malnutrition (MAM). In Bangladesh, more than 2 million children suffer from MAM. According to Bangladesh Demographic Health Survey 2014 26%, 25% and 17% of children aged less than two years are stunted, underweight and wasted respectively.