Innovation

What novel food-based products and programming methods effectively prevent and treat undernutrition?

Color: 
#490c66
Supporting Literature: 
  • Webb, Patrick, Beatrice Lorge Rogers, Irwin Rosenberg, Nina Schlossman, Christine Wanke, Jack Bagriansky, Kate Sadler, Quentin Johnson, Jessica Tilahun, Amelia Reese Masterson, Anuradha Narayan. 2011. Improving the Nutritional Quality of U.S. Food Aid: Recommendations for Changes to Products and Programs. Boston, MA: Tufts University.
  • 2013 Maternal and Child Nutrition series - The Lancet
  • Shoham, Jeremy, et al. "Proceedings of the World Health Organization/UNICEF/World Food Programme/United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees Consultation on the management of moderate malnutrition in children under 5 years of age." Food and nutrition bulletin. Vol. 30. No. 3 (Supplement). United Nations University Press, 2009.
  • Stone-Jimenez, Maryanne. "Preventing Moderate Acute Malnutrition (MAM) Through Nutrition-Specific Interventions." (2014).
  • Webb, Patrick. "Standards of Evidence for Research on ‘What Works’ in the Management of MAM." (2014).
Long Description: 

- Are cash transfers better than food aid alone?
- Does including a behavior change communication aspect in food aid programs lead to better outcomes?
- Can locally produced foods reduce undernutrition?

Scaling up Small-Scale Food Processing to Promote Food Security Among Women Farmers in Rural Vietnam

Brief Summary:
This repeated measures, cluster randomized, cohort trial design was carried out in three provinces in the northern mountainous area of Vietnam. Communes here were randomly selected for community based interventions with local production complimentary foods and marketing and distribution of fortified complimentary foods.

Community-based Clinical Trial With Microbiota Directed Complementary Foods (MDCFs) Made of Locally Available Food Ingredients for the Management of Children With Post-severe Acute Malnutrition Moderate Acute Malnutrition (Post-SAM MAM)

Brief Summary:

Background (brief):

Cluster Randomized, Parallel-group, Prospective, Follow-up Effectiveness Study in Kenyan Children 6-35 Months

Malnutrition is a public health problem in Kenya, with 26% of children under-five years of age stunted, and 26% of pre-school children, 26% of women of reproductive age and 42% of pregnant women being anaemic, respectively. Agriculture is the main source of income, food and nutrients for the majority of rural families in Sub-Saharan Africa including Kenya. Most farmers are smallholders and are vulnerable to poor nutrition.