Innovation

What novel food-based products and programming methods effectively prevent and treat undernutrition?

Color: 
#490c66
Supporting Literature: 
  • Webb, Patrick, Beatrice Lorge Rogers, Irwin Rosenberg, Nina Schlossman, Christine Wanke, Jack Bagriansky, Kate Sadler, Quentin Johnson, Jessica Tilahun, Amelia Reese Masterson, Anuradha Narayan. 2011. Improving the Nutritional Quality of U.S. Food Aid: Recommendations for Changes to Products and Programs. Boston, MA: Tufts University.
  • 2013 Maternal and Child Nutrition series - The Lancet
  • Shoham, Jeremy, et al. "Proceedings of the World Health Organization/UNICEF/World Food Programme/United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees Consultation on the management of moderate malnutrition in children under 5 years of age." Food and nutrition bulletin. Vol. 30. No. 3 (Supplement). United Nations University Press, 2009.
  • Stone-Jimenez, Maryanne. "Preventing Moderate Acute Malnutrition (MAM) Through Nutrition-Specific Interventions." (2014).
  • Webb, Patrick. "Standards of Evidence for Research on ‘What Works’ in the Management of MAM." (2014).
Long Description: 

- Are cash transfers better than food aid alone?
- Does including a behavior change communication aspect in food aid programs lead to better outcomes?
- Can locally produced foods reduce undernutrition?

Acceptability and efficacy of locally produced ready-to-use therapeutic food nutreal in the management of severe acute malnutrition in comparison with defined food: A randomized control trial

Acceptability and efficacy of locally produced ready-to-use therapeutic food nutreal in the management of severe acute malnutrition in comparison with defined food: A randomized control trial

Effects of unconditional cash transfers on the outcome of treatment for severe acute malnutrition (SAM): a cluster-randomised trial in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

Effects of unconditional cash transfers on the outcome of treatment for severe acute malnutrition (SAM): a cluster-randomised trial in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

 

The impact of integrated infant and young child feeding and micronutrient powder intervention on feeding practices and anemia in children aged 6-23 months in Madagascar

The impact of integrated infant and young child feeding and micronutrient powder intervention on feeding practices and anemia in children aged 6-23 months in Madagascar

Unconditional cash transfers do not prevent children's undernutrition in the Moderate Acute Malnutrition Out (MAM'Out) cluster-randomized controlled trial in rural Burkina Faso

Unconditional cash transfers do not prevent children's undernutrition in the Moderate Acute Malnutrition Out (MAM'Out) cluster-randomized controlled trial in rural Burkina Faso

Adding a water, sanitation and hygiene intervention and a lipid-based nutrient supplement to an integrated agriculture and nutrition program improved the nutritional status of young Burkinabé children

Adding a water, sanitation and hygiene intervention and a lipid-based nutrient supplement to an integrated agriculture and nutrition program improved the nutritional status of young Burkinabé children

Effectiveness of three commonly used transition phase diets in the inpatient management of children with severe acute malnutrition: a pilot randomized controlled trial in Malawi

Effectiveness of three commonly used transition phase diets in the inpatient management of children with severe acute malnutrition: a pilot randomized controlled trial in Malawi

Comparative analysis of complementary feeds in children with moderate acute malnutrition

Malnutrition results from qualitative or quantitative deficiency of dietary nutrient. Most cases of childhood malnutrition occur in Asia and Africa and are often associated with poverty, ignorance and concomitant childhood infectious diseases. The condition can be sub-classified into mild, moderate and severe malnutrition in relation to the standard reference values for age and sex based on the World Health Organization classification. Malnutrition leads to impaired physical, immunologic, neurologic and neurologic development.

Feeding malnourished children different types of fatty acids to promote neurocognitive development

An appropriate balance of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids is important for support of neurocognitive development in healthy infants and toddlers. In young children recovering from severe acute malnutrition (SAM), excess omega-6 intake depletes omega-3 fatty acid status. This research will evaluate how novel ready-to-use therapeutic foods (RUTF) with balanced fatty acids improve the metabolic and neurocognitive effects in young children in Malawi recovering from SAM, yielding new knowledge that also has implications for development of well-nourished children.